Only people with recent injuries or operations on the wrist, elbow or shoulder should wait until they have healed.

That happens because the tendon hits the forearm after loosening it, “says Kemmer. A suitable forearm protector can help.

Family-friendly sport

But who is archery suitable for? For everyone, says physiotherapist Kemmer. Only people with recent injuries or operations on the wrist, elbow or shoulder should wait until they have healed.

Sonja Höfer and Robert Buchinger emphasize that archery is increasingly becoming a family sport. “It’s great that you can do the sport together, since different skills don’t matter,” says Buchinger. The oldest participant so far was 84. However, children should be at least eight years old so that they can concentrate for two hours.

And more and more often, says Höfer, grandparents come to the course with their grandchildren in order to then go on a stalking stalk to the plastic deer.

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The stay in nature is relaxed, coordination and concentration are trained and neck and back muscles are strengthened: No wonder that archery is booming and more and more people go on the prowl.

Whether deer, mountain goat, elk or frog – no animal is safe in the Vienna Woods. Because on nice weekends, up to 400 people armed with bows and arrows roam the thicket. Animal rights activists can rest assured: there is no blood flowing, no real animal is harmed here. Deer, mountain goat, elk and frog are made of plastic. And the supposed hunters are people who count 3D archery among their hobbies.

“The sport is booming at the moment. Every year more people come to us who want to try archery,” says Karl Hudak, manager of the archery facility in Irenental, Lower Austria. With 90 hectares, the facility is one of the largest in Austria and, due to its proximity to Vienna, also one of the most visited.

© Ricardo Herrgott

The special thing about 3D archery is that it is not shot at targets. Rather, the targets along a course are plastic animals that look confusingly similar to real ones from a distance. Own companies have already specialized in the production of life-size deer, owls and goats – good business. A moose costs around 3,200 euros and has to be replaced every six months. “The targets are quickly destroyed by the bombardment.123helpme The smaller, the faster. They are made in such a way that they can be turned around once. Nevertheless, smaller animals have to be swapped every few weeks in the summer,” explains Hudak. Around 60,000 euros are spent annually in the Irenental on new animals.

Up to 200 km / h

Some courses lead over fields, others require a very good physical condition, as they run in mountainous terrain. There are three different routes in the Irenental, all of which lead uphill and downhill on narrow paths through the Vienna Woods. The longest course has 30 goals spread over a distance of 4.2 kilometers. Around three hours is a realistic time that should be planned for. Some visitors are much faster, however, says Hudak: “There are always people who walk the course, some of them even barefoot. They only stop with the animals for a short time, aim, hit and keep running.”

The vast majority, however, enjoy exercise and being in nature and occasionally take breaks. The path between the individual destinations is well marked, making it almost impossible to get lost in the forest. However, it is forbidden to walk in the opposite direction. “That would be far too dangerous,” says Hudak. Because of course an arrow could miss the target at any time. Should a person be hit, this would lead to serious injuries or in the worst case could even be fatal. After all, an arrow reaches speeds of 200 kilometers per hour. So-called compound bows, with which the arrows can go as fast as 300 km / h, are forbidden on the facility in the Irenental.

Three shots are allowed per target. Whoever scores goes on to the next goal.

Strengthens your back

Robert Buchinger and Sonja Höfer have been coming to the Vienna Woods regularly to practice archery for seven years. You trained as a trainer and now hold courses. “It’s a great sport and we can also take our dog with us,” says Höfer.

© Ricardo Herrgott

Anyone who wants to complete a course in the Irenental must either be an experienced archer or attend a two-hour course beforehand. Among other things, the safety precautions and the optimal movements in archery are learned.

When done correctly, archery is not only fun, it also has a positive effect on posture. “The upper back muscles can lead to problems in the sense of a hunched back, especially when doing sedentary work,” says sports scientist and physiotherapist Gerald Kemmer. In archery, almost the entire upper body – especially the shoulder and back muscles – is strengthened. “The upright posture when shooting specifically trains the muscles between the shoulder blades. This leads to an upright posture and less pain.”

Kemmer, who works full-time as a physiotherapist at SK Rapid Wien, is an avid archer himself. He appreciates “the relaxation that comes with archery”: “For me it is a wonderful sport to compensate for stressful everyday work, a kind of ‘energy filling station’. You have to forget everyday worries and at the end you only concentrate on the target and your posture.”

In addition, coordination is trained. Because the courses almost always lead through rough terrain and over bumpy ground. Hand-eye coordination, which is important for brain performance, is also trained.

Bruising possible

It takes some practice to actually hit the target. According to trainer Robert Buchinger, the first successes can be seen after the two-hour course.

Buchinger himself is an intuitive archer. Instead of using an aiming device, he focuses on the plastic animals with both eyes. The decision as to when the perfect time to shoot is then made intuitively. Obviously, the more practice and experience someone has, the better the hit rate. After all, in 3D archery, it’s not just the size of the targets that varies. The distance from which shooting is also different from animal to animal. The course also runs through impassable terrain. It is therefore necessary to shoot uphill and downhill, and sometimes athletes kneel or lie on the ground to score.

© Ricardo Herrgott

Anyone who practices this sport must be aware that bows and arrows are actually weapons, and accordingly use them carefully. If everyone adheres to the safety regulations of a facility, it is still a relatively safe sport. “Wounds that occur regularly can be bruises on the forearm. This happens because the tendon hits the forearm after it has been loosened,” says Kemmer. A suitable forearm protector can help.

Family-friendly sport

But who is archery suitable for? For everyone, says physiotherapist Kemmer. Only people with recent injuries or operations on the wrist, elbow or shoulder should wait until they have healed.

Sonja Höfer and Robert Buchinger emphasize that archery is increasingly becoming a family sport. “It’s great that you can do the sport together, since different skills don’t matter,” says Buchinger. The oldest participant so far was 84. However, children should be at least eight years old so that they can concentrate for two hours.

And more and more often, says Höfer, grandparents come to the course with their grandchildren in order to then go on a stalking stalk to the plastic deer.

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically.

More on this ▶

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New access (yachtrevue.at)

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In the new trend: Shock-Down – how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (Trend.at)

The 35 best family series to laugh and feel good (tv-media.at)

E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

The stay in nature is relaxed, coordination and concentration are trained and neck and back muscles are strengthened: No wonder that archery is booming and more and more people go on the prowl.

Whether deer, mountain goat, elk or frog – no animal is safe in the Vienna Woods. Because on nice weekends, up to 400 people armed with bows and arrows roam the thicket. Animal rights activists can rest assured: there is no blood flowing, no real animal is harmed here. Deer, mountain goat, elk and frog are made of plastic. And the supposed hunters are people who count 3D archery among their hobbies.

“The sport is booming at the moment. Every year more people come to us who want to try archery,” says Karl Hudak, manager of the archery facility in Irenental, Lower Austria. With 90 hectares, the facility is one of the largest in Austria and, due to its proximity to Vienna, also one of the most visited.

© Ricardo Herrgott

The special thing about 3D archery is that it is not shot at targets. Rather, the targets along a course are plastic animals that look confusingly similar to real ones from a distance. Own companies have already specialized in the production of life-size deer, owls and goats – good business. A moose costs around 3,200 euros and has to be replaced every six months. “The targets are quickly destroyed by the bombardment. The smaller, the faster. They are made in such a way that they can be turned around once. Nevertheless, smaller animals have to be swapped every few weeks in the summer,” explains Hudak. Around 60,000 euros are spent annually in the Irenental on new animals.

Up to 200 km / h

Some courses lead over fields, others require a very good physical condition, as they run in mountainous terrain. There are three different routes in the Irenental, all of which lead uphill and downhill on narrow paths through the Vienna Woods. The longest course has 30 goals spread over a distance of 4.2 kilometers. Around three hours is a realistic time that should be planned for. Some visitors are much faster, however, says Hudak: “There are always people who walk the course, some of them even barefoot. They only stop with the animals for a short time, aim, hit and keep running.”

The vast majority, however, enjoy exercise and being in nature and occasionally take breaks. The path between the individual destinations is well marked, making it almost impossible to get lost in the forest. However, it is forbidden to walk in the opposite direction. “That would be far too dangerous,” says Hudak. Because of course an arrow could miss the target at any time. Should a person be hit, this would lead to serious injuries or in the worst case could even be fatal. After all, an arrow reaches speeds of 200 kilometers per hour. So-called compound bows, with which the arrows can go as fast as 300 km / h, are forbidden on the facility in the Irenental.

Three shots are allowed per target. Whoever scores goes on to the next goal.

Strengthens your back

Robert Buchinger and Sonja Höfer have been coming to the Vienna Woods regularly to practice archery for seven years. You trained as a trainer and now hold courses. “It’s a great sport and we can also take our dog with us,” says Höfer.

© Ricardo Herrgott

Anyone who wants to complete a course in the Irenental must either be an experienced archer or attend a two-hour course beforehand. Among other things, the safety precautions and the optimal movements in archery are learned.

When done correctly, archery is not only fun, it also has a positive effect on posture. “The upper back muscles can lead to problems in the sense of a hunched back, especially when doing sedentary work,” says sports scientist and physiotherapist Gerald Kemmer. In archery, almost the entire upper body – especially the shoulder and back muscles – is strengthened. “The upright posture when shooting specifically trains the muscles between the shoulder blades. This leads to an upright posture and less pain.”

Kemmer, who works full-time as a physiotherapist at SK Rapid Wien, is an avid archer himself. He appreciates “the relaxation that comes with archery”: “For me it is a wonderful sport to compensate for stressful everyday work, a kind of ‘energy filling station’. You have to forget everyday worries and at the end you only concentrate on the target and your posture.”

In addition, coordination is trained. Because the courses almost always lead through rough terrain and over bumpy ground. Hand-eye coordination, which is important for brain performance, is also trained.

Bruising possible

It takes some practice to actually hit the target. According to trainer Robert Buchinger, the first successes can be seen after the two-hour course.

Buchinger himself is an intuitive archer. Instead of using an aiming device, he focuses on the plastic animals with both eyes. The decision as to when the perfect time to shoot is then made intuitively. Obviously, the more practice and experience someone has, the better the hit rate. After all, in 3D archery, it’s not just the size of the targets that varies. The distance from which shooting is also different from animal to animal. The course also runs through impassable terrain. It is therefore necessary to shoot uphill and downhill, and sometimes athletes kneel or lie on the ground to score.

© Ricardo Herrgott

Anyone who practices this sport must be aware that bows and arrows are actually weapons, and accordingly use them carefully.